Krista Tippett

Krista Tippett

December 18, 2012

Krista Tippett on not playing the Christmas game of obligatory gift-giving and the redemptive human need for one another.

July 12, 2012

The lessons from the Green Patriarch's environmental summit in Turkey may not rest in facts and data, but in our religious traditions' knowledge that inspiring people to do what's best for the good of the whole.

June 05, 2012

Of all the ideas Janna Levin presents, the most provocative and disturbing, perhaps, is her doubt that there is free will in human existence at all. She cannot be sure that we are not utterly determined by brilliant principles of physics and biology. Yet she cleaves more fiercely in the face of this belief to the reality of her love of her children and her hopes and dreams for them.

May 28, 2012

I first began to gain a kind of respect for the revenge impulse in human life when we worked, in the early days of this program, on a show about the death penalty. I came to understand that revenge was the original “criminal justice system.”

May 24, 2012

For the marketer, the freelancer and the entrepreneur, the challenge is to level set, to be comfortable with the undone, with the cycle of never-ending. We were trained to finish our homework, our peas and our chores. Today, we’re never finished, and that’s okay.

It’s a dance, not an endless grind.

Seth Godin, from his blog entry “Dancing on the edge of finished”

May 19, 2012

I experienced Sarah Kay at a gathering on Nantucket Island last fall. Collected there were the CEO of Google, the founder of the X PRIZE, and an eminent Broadway director. But each time this lovely 23-year-old took the stage to perform a poem, the audience quieted, reflected, and delighted in a completely different way.

May 12, 2012

Silence, as Gordon Hempton experiences and seeks to preserve it, is not a vacuum defined by emptiness. It's not an absence of sound, but an absence of noise. True quiet has presence, he says, and is a "think tank of the soul." It is quiet that is quieting.

May 10, 2012

But there is a different story in the DNA of Oklahoma politics. It’s a truly forgotten story in the relatively brief history of this state that people fled the past to create. When the former Indian Territory became Oklahoma in 1907, it had one of the most progressive constitutions in the union, influenced largely by a farmer-labor coalition.

May 06, 2012

U.S. culture glorifies “perfect” bodies. At the other end of that spectrum, we champion people who fight when their bodies fail. Matthew Sanford has charted another way. In his lyrical memoir, he describes how he learned to live in his whole body again, despite an irreversible paralysis, in part through the practice of yoga.

April 29, 2012

It's difficult to believe these days, when so many of us have had some experience of moving toward death with a loved one in hospice, or even a stranger on the CaringBridge website, how "badly" people died in this country until very recently.

April 21, 2012

I can't say that I knew much about Sitting Bull when we began this research several years ago. His was the final name in our first series of shows on the spiritual legacy of historical figures.

April 15, 2012

Recently I spoke to a class of college students — by way of Skype — in southern Minnesota. We talked about how religion is portrayed through news media. As often in my experience, this was a critical discussion about the narrow and often inflammatory way religion comes up, and usually in the context of politics.

April 01, 2012

I picked up Sylvia Boorstein's lovely book, That's Funny, You Don't Look Buddhist, years ago and loved it. Then, several years later, I found myself on a panel discussion with her and loved her in person.

February 18, 2012

The singer and composer Meredith Monk is a kind of archeologist of the human voice. She's also an archeologist of the human soul, with a long-time Buddhist practice.

February 11, 2012

Near El Fahser in North DarfurTwo girls walk through the market in the Abushouk Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) camp, home to nearly 55,000 people, near the North Darfur capital El Fasher. (photo: Ian Timberlake/AFP/Getty Images)

I wasn't always a fan of Nicholas Kristof's columns in The New York Times. I'd found them at times simplistic — seeming to reduce the dramas of entire nations to individual stories of despair and/or hope. But I've discovered that there is an art and science to this approach. It was fascinating — and quite inspiring — to sit down and get inside his head on all of this.

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