—Mike Sweeney, designated hitter for the Seattle Mariners

Hey sports fans, CNN recently compiled a dozen photos showing athletes “in prayer” and asking, “When did God become a sports fan?” The article focuses primarily on this as a Christian question, but the image of former Muslim NBA star Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf (born Chris Jackson) made me more curious about how athletes of other faiths invoke God in their sport. This 2007 profile of Abdul-Rauf, “The Conversion of Chris Jackson,” gives more depth to the question.


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2Reflections

Reflections

The same could be said of all petitionary prayer.

This type of prayer is different in some ways than other forms of petitionary prayer. Sports are generally zero sum games-- your loss is my win. Wisdom, beauty, love, faith and health which are frequently the objectives of petitionary prayer are not this way. My good health doesn't take away from your health. God doesn't have to deprive you of health to give it to me.
As to the overall question, does God bless those who have more faith? I don't know. Can't say. I just think sometimes we make mistakes in our own definitions of blessing. Winning for example isn't always a blessing

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