Gathering to Aspire and Challenge Each Other

Friday, January 27, 2017 - 5:43 pm

Gathering to Aspire and Challenge Each Other

Yesterday’s inauguration is at the forefront of many people’s minds, including our columnists and new contributing writer Jennifer Bailey. They take the opportunity to aspire, challenge, and gather together.

People pray together during a vigil in front of the North Charleston City Hall for Walter Scott on April 10, 2015 in North Charleston, South Carolina. (Joe Raedle / Getty Images / © All Rights Reserved)

Jennifer Bailey
I Am the Breathing Legacy of One of America’s Great Original Sins

For many people of color, the feeling of safety is fluid and often fleeting. A dynamic, millennial minister ordained in the African Methodist Episcopal Church invokes the presence of her ancestors, and calls for “brave spaces for remaking the world as we know it”:

“The question at the forefront of my mind is the same one Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. asked so many years ago: ‘Where do we go from here? Chaos or Community?’ I choose community. The community I long for will not be found in shallow platitudes promoting reconciliation. It will require the courage of everyday heroes to dig deep and find within themselves the wherewithal to lean into one another and repair the breech of relationships this election has exposed.”

(Open Master’s / © All Rights Reserved)

Angie Thurston
The Radical Art of Learning from Within
Education often looks outward and ignores the inner life. But what if learning began with turning inward and mapping that journey to the person we want to become? Enter the Open Master’s, a self-directed degree for lifelong learning while taking the soul into account:

“Educating a new generation to live and lead with integrity — which is to say, in alignment with that life-giving core of the human self — will require containers that hold both inner inquiry and soulful community. If we are to raise a different kind of leader, we need to recognize and nurture the inner lives of each new generation…”

(Reiner Girsch / Flickr )

Parker Palmer
The Soul of a Patriot

“What would it mean to have a ‘lover’s quarrel’ with my country right now, animated by the fierce love my soul would affirm?”

A well-received column from Parker, who offers four answers to his own challenging question.

A girl dances to the beat of a drum line during a protest after the funeral of Freddie Gray, on April 28, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland.

A girl dances to the beat of a drum line during a protest after the funeral of Freddie Gray, on April 28, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Andrew Burton / Getty Images / © All Rights Reserved)

Courtney Martin
Five Reasons Why Taking to the Streets Still Matters

“Joy doesn’t betray but sustains activism. And when you face a politics that aspires to make you fearful, alienated and isolated, joy is a fine act of insurrection.”

Courtney draws on this quotation from Rebecca Solnit in her column this week. She offers five points of encouragement to show up in person, and have your heart be where your feet are at.

Osie James carries a photo of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during the annual Martin Luther King Day march on January 16, 2017 in Memphis, Tennessee.

Osie James carries a photo of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during the annual Martin Luther King Day march on January 16, 2017 in Memphis, Tennessee. (Mike Brown / Getty Images / © All Rights Reserved)

Omid Safi
What Would Brother Martin Say?
Omid takes this post-election moment to examine where our nation stands on the long journey to the beloved community Dr. Martin Luther King dreamed of:

“Let us become this strong, fierce, and unconditional love. Let us keep track of this love, because it is when this love moves into the public square that we call it justice.”

An Instagram Account We Love

Amos Kennedy

“Each person must live their life as a model for others.”

While producing an episode about Auburn University’s Rural Studio many years ago, I met Amos Kennedy who hand-sets type for posters and books using old Heidelberg presses. His letterpress posters contain messages of hope, inspiration, and sometimes humorous but critical warnings. He’s a delightful character, and I find wisdom in his art that often feels tailor-made for that specific day.

May the wind always be at your back!
Trent

Share Post

Contributor

is the cofounder of On Being and currently serves as publisher & editor-in-chief. He received a Peabody Award in 2007 for his work on “The Ecstatic Faith of Rumi” and garnered two Webby Awards (in 2005, and again in 2008). The Online News Association nominated his journalistic work multiple times in the general excellence and outstanding specialty journalism categories. Trent’s reported and produced stories from Turkey to rural Alabama, from Israel and the West Bank to Cambridge, England.

Share Your Reflection

Reflections

apples