Christian Wiman —
A Call to Doubt and Faith, and Remembering God

The poet Christian Wiman is giving voice to the hunger for faith — and the challenges of faith — for people living now. After a Texas upbringing soaked in a history of violence and a charismatic Christian culture, he was agnostic until he became actively religious again in his late 30s. Then he was diagnosed with a rare form of incurable blood cancer. He's bearing witness to something new happening in himself and in the world.

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is a poet and editor of Poetry magazine. He's the author of several volumes of poetry including Every Riven Thing.

Poems You Heard and Others You Didn't

The Poet Wiman Reads His Poems

Read and listen to all the poems recited by Christian Wiman during Krista's interview — and few of them not included in the show. Enjoy, then share them with others:

» And I Said To My Soul, Be Loud
» Every Riven Thing
» For D.
» From a Window
» Hammer Is the Prayer
» It Takes Particular Clicks
» The Reservoir
» This Mind of Dying
» And I Was Alive
» These Poems, She Said

Selected Readings

"Hive of Nerves" by Christian Wiman

To be alive spiritually is to feel the ultimate anxiety of existence within the trivial anxieties of everyday life.

"The Limit" by Christian Wiman

An essay to wake you up. Wiman tells the tense story of growing up in West Texas and his friend's hunting accident, which might've been his own. He writes about about faith with an intellectual edge and dry tone that is anything but dull.

"Love Bade Me Welcome (Gazing Into the Abyss)" by Christian Wiman

In this moving personal essay, Mr. Wiman traces three events in his life — "each shattering in his own way" — how his Christian faith and existential anxiety have shaped his imagination.

About the Image

A young man keeps his head above water as he looks on at the shoreline and trees.

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37Reflections

Reflections

Poetry as powerful as urinary proteins asserting "I AM/WAS HERE!" If only I could preach with such soul!

Fantastic show. I've listened to the podcast 4 times already. I completely resonate with the sentiments expressed here by Christina Wiman and Krista. I grew up in a very conservative Christian culture and attended a Christian Bible College. I have found that the Christian culture I grew up with is not very realistic or helpful. I even tried being an atheist for 30 days and found that just as religious as the Christian culture I was trying to dismiss. I too am working on re-defining what being a Christian means for me today. On Being is a source of inspiration and hope.

It's been a long hard day, and a long hard week, and so it was a blessing to just sit with my dog, my cats, and my cup of tea and listen to your show with Christian Wiman. How lovely. So much beauty. And his reading of his poem "Every Riven Thing" at the end was truly glorious. thank you.

A: Krista and On Being Staff,

I loved the interview with poet, essayist and editor-- Christian Wiman. I had a similar spiritual childhood. I am Episcopalian now instead of Southern Baptist. I am a painter and a poet also. Let Christian know that I hung on every word of that he and Krista spoke. I am a subscriber to "Poetry" magazine and have read all of Christian's essays and I love his poetry as well. Krista, keep inspiring and shining! The world needs your inner light. Here is one of my poems and I have also attached one of my paintings. Peace be always with you! Sincerely yours, Gari Hatch

"Who Brushes Here"

The soul, it travels slanted ways,
where spates of light descend the days.

Between the space that opens clear,
it shutters on the tables veneer.

Stodgy, stilted, a seizure provoked,
then all at once, moving smooth and cloaked.

Sputtering spirit spilling surprise,
hallow, haloed, with a beams disguise.

Abrupt, erupt, a rabid fling,
then soothing as grace in heavens sling.

Entities spanning the particle rays,
who brushes here, who are these strays?

Gari Hatch
06-04-2009

Wiman creates a vivid imagery that describes the differences between the main stream notion of faith and religion and his understanding of a more subtle and less complex experience. I empathized with his comment about missing the intensity of religion that he used to experience before his revived faith later in his life. The shattering of his former ideas of faith create a personal experience of what breaking religious myth looks like after we challenge what we thought we knew.

I can’t help but wonder what Wiman believes happens at the time of death. He mentions that he does not share the common belief in heaven. Other On Being guests have asserted similar ideas. Could the heaven that people wait for, be the heaven that are participating in currently as suggested in the bible and other religious texts. Poetry may be one of the few ways to convey the abstract and ungraspable messages that are solidified in religion and faith. I enjoyed the interview and the ideas that Wiman shared.

Wiman creates a vivid imagery that describes the differences between the main stream notion of faith and religion and his understanding of a more subtle and less complex experience. I empathized with his comment about missing the intensity of religion that he used to experience before his revived faith later in his life. The shattering of his former ideas of faith create a personal experience of what breaking religious myth looks like after we challenge what we thought we knew.

I cant help but wonder what Wiman believes happens at the time of death. He mentions that he does not share the common belief in heaven. Other On Being guests have asserted similar ideas. Could the heaven that people wait for, be the heaven that are participating in currently as suggested in the bible and other religious texts. Poetry may be one of the few ways to convey the abstract and ungraspable messages that are solidified in religion and faith. I enjoyed the interview and the ideas that Wiman shared.

I found many this podcast of “Remembering God” with Christian Wiman quite interesting. It was interesting when Wiman was defining his meaning of faith and beliefs. “The way I've defined it to myself is I think of belief as having objects. Faith doesn't have objects. Faith is an orientation of your life or it's an energy of your life or however you want to define it. But I think it is objectless.” The way Wiman puts it, I would agree and understand why because like he mentioned, faith is by actions and I would say with trust. As for beliefs it is as having objects, such as having something to hope for. I really liked his take on it.
Another thing I liked that Christian Wiman said was, “I am convinced that the same God that might call me to sing of God at one time might call me at another to sing of godlessness. Sometimes when I think of all this energy that's going on, all of these different people trying to find some way of naming and sharing their belief — I think it may be the case that God calls some people to unbelief in order that faith can take new forms.” I felt that this does speak to me. What I’m getting from that quote is that God calls everyone differently and in different ways even if it’s unbelief. Whichever one it is, the way I see it is that either way, our faith will take new forms since faith is of having actions and trust. However, it’s not always going to be of actions since there is doubt. With that being said I think that, faith comes and go and when it does it takes a new form.

I truly enjoyed listening to the broadcast, "Remembering God" with the poet Christian Wiman concerning faith and its involvement in his own life. Many things were discussed that sparked my interest including the connectedness of faith and love, the difference between belief and faith, and the modern day idea of faith.

Wiman and Krista Tippett talked about how true love increases our awareness of transcendence and mystery. Not just romantic love, but love for our family and friends as well. The overwhelming feeling of love demands to be expressed beyond our means of expressing it, transforming into excess energy that is in fact the essence of God. With this increased awareness our spirituality can flourish, inviting faith into our lives. Religion is what we make of these intense times of spirituality. While belonging to a certain religion does not necessarily mean agreeing with everything that particular religion says, it rather means acknowledging incredible moments in your life of joy or suffering and demanding action to express it and share it with others. As in love, the intense feeling is not always present with faith, yet its constant presence is not necessary (or realistic) in spiritual growth.

The idea that faith and belief are words that mean completely different things was also discussed. Wiman has written "Faith is not a state of mind but an action in the world, a movement towards the world." He expresses the idea that belief is having objects while faith is an orientation of your life, an energy of your life that is object less. Many people need religious elements in their life such as church attendance to project their spiritual energy outward. In his opinion, the way we know our spiritual inclinations are valid is because they lead out of ourselves.

Wiman expressed multiple ideas in relation to faith in the present day and its impact on our lives. Many people today are given the opportunity to choose their own spiritual and religious path, inviting them to actively seek a way to find God with others. Traditional religious language is evolving to include many religions and practices creating new forms of expression. As a culture, we are looking to grasp a sense of religion and spirituality that encompasses clarity as well as openness to engage the parts of us that are beyond our understanding. The intriguing question was brought up, "How do we reach for God in the midst of this life when we are constantly being overwhelmed by life?" Wiman believes the inability to have a close connection with God is a result of us being too involved with ourselves as a person and not with our soul. In terms of doubt in relation to faith, Wiman believes it is not separate from but actually a part of faith. He asserts that God calls some people to unbelief so that faith can take on new forms.

Overall, this was a very powerful and thought-provoking broadcast that invites the listener to question how faith fits into their own life.

With the statement, “its God in us, trying to get back to its source” I was intrigued. If we and everything else in existence was created by God, could this all be constructed by God itself? Would it not make sense that the part of God in us wants to be directly connected to the rest of this being? When he says that statement, he is implying that we have a natural inclination to search for God, but he does not restrict how we can conduct this search. He has friends that find it through the Bible, and he says some find it through speaking with others, but none of it is wrong. This is a respectable way to look at it.
He also speaks about God being something we cannot come to understand on our own, but rather needs an outside source. If I understand his statements correctly, love can be this outside source, or connection. This is very interesting as love is a powerful and inexplicable emotion, and nearly anything can come from a reaction to it.
This was a very interesting show, and I enjoyed it very much. I really like how he does not limit what God could be, or how we could interact with it. Keeping an open mind while trying to understand something that is beyond understanding would seem to be a requirement.

I found it interesting how Christian Wiman describes that he believes that God turns people into unbelievers so the faith of God can come in a new form. I think it is important not to look at faith or religion forcefully; it should come naturally in time. Also, it seems to be a different world now with religion and Christianity where there are so many non-believers. The solitude and wholeness of Christianity seems to be fading. When people look back on their childhood, religion isn’t such a big part of one’s memory. The aspects of everyday lives were surrounded by having faith and staying strong. As Christian Wilman describes about how poetry faded for him because he had false expectations, this reminded me of religion and what people search for within a religion. Spirituality doesn’t have absolute clarity; a person must have faith simply in faith. Faith is more of a part of you and, as Christian Wilman describes, it is an energy that is with you. More people seem to be lost with religion and left with so many questions and now there is a new language and form being created. The aspects of how religions and religious aspects are categorized into such define concepts are being blurred into a bigger picture. Furthermore, I liked how Christian Wilman describes that Christ comes alive in communion between people and how just communication of religion and life can stabilize you in the unstable world. Moreover, I really enjoyed relating faith with the feeling of love and how it can be so fierce and absolute in the beginning and sometimes slowly fades until you realize there is no more faith or love anymore. One must cycle through the process to truly realize. Also, Christian Wiman describes that life is full of the past and ideas of the future and present isn’t really there. I do think that the past defines us. Moreover, the idea of heaven tends to planted in our minds that it is hard not to think of heaven in our afterlife. Although, it is so planted in everyone, I do think that the concept of heaven varies greatly with our imagination as Christian Wiman describes. Overall, Chrisitian Wiman dedicated his life to poetry and faith with God while finding love with the ones he cared dearly for. Amber Lyrek

Remembering God
I found it interesting how Christian Wiman describes that he believes that God turns people into unbelievers so the faith of God can come in a new form. I think it is important not to look at faith or religion forcefully; it should come naturally in time. Also, it seems to be a different world now with religion and Christianity where there are so many non-believers. The solitude and wholeness of Christianity seems to be fading. When people look back on their childhood, religion isn’t such a big part of one’s memory. The aspects of everyday lives were surrounded by having faith and staying strong. As Christian Wilman describes about how poetry faded for him because he had false expectations, this reminded me of religion and what people search for within a religion. Spirituality doesn’t have absolute clarity; a person must have faith simply in faith. Faith is more of a part of you and, as Christian Wilman describes, it is an energy that is with you. More people seem to be lost with religion and left with so many questions and now there is a new language and form being created. The aspects of how religions and religious aspects are categorized into such define concepts are being blurred into a bigger picture.
Furthermore, I liked how Christian Wilman describes that Christ comes alive in communion between people and how just communication of religion and life can stabilize you in the unstable world. Moreover, I really enjoyed relating faith with the feeling of love and how it can be so fierce and absolute in the beginning and sometimes slowly fades until you realize there is no more faith or love anymore. One must cycle through the process to truly realize. Also, Christian Wiman describes that life is full of the past and ideas of the future and present isn’t really there. I do think that the past defines us. Moreover, the idea of heaven tends to planted in our minds that it is hard not to think of heaven in our afterlife. Although, it is so planted in everyone, I do think that the concept of heaven varies greatly with our imagination as Christian Wiman describes. Overall, Chrisitian Wiman dedicated his life to poetry and faith with God while finding love with the ones he cared dearly for.

Amber Lyrek

I so appreciate your words in the Journal Star today. The oienpng up of yourself and your faith for all the world (well, all of Lincoln) to see. I think I find myself unwavering in some areas and wrestling in others. It used to bother me...the wrestling. And then I would remember that story about Jacob and how he would not back down against GOD (of all people) until he got what he wanted. And in the end, Jacob came away with a new name and (quite literally) a new way of walking. And so I just keep limping along on my journey of unwavering faith in a God who welcomes my wrestling and questioning mind.

Hello,
In this week's episome Wiman said something about someone (Hamer, I think) who said something about how today the self has taken the place of the soul. Who was he referencing? Are there any books or articles you could steer me towards?
Love you show--thank you for doing what yall do!
Take care
Jon Little

Hi Jon, I checked with Christian Wiman, and the poet he was referencing is named Fanny Howe - here's her profile at the Poetry Foundation's website, including a bibliography: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/fanny-howe

Dave

I find it profoundly sad whenever I hear of someone who broke free of established religion as a young person and resolved to think independently, only to fall back into the same old prescribed patterns later in life. Sometimes the proximal cause is getting married or having children and caving to the social or family expectations for baptism, church ceremonies, etc. Other times it is the approach of death, and the fear of it, that prompt a return to superstition/religion. Then the intellectual independence goes out the window. That is why I find the philosopher David Hume so inspiring - his religious friends converged on his deathbed to gloat over his death-bed conversion - but it didn't come, and he had the last laugh.

Can you have a show about maintaining spiritual and intellectual independence from religion later in life, in the face of social pressures and the proximity of death? That would be truly inspiring and of great relevance to the growing number of young people who are staking out their independence from religion and might be tempted by backsliding in a few years time? Thank you.

I agree with you 100%. During the piece I felt that Christian Wilman was backing into atheism but could never admit to it, even though his searching did appear to be heartfelt. He focused on missing the intensity of religious very much, but also talk a lot about being honest about reality. He doesn't believe in the Christian idea of heaven, but astutely avoided talking about a belief, or lack of belief in God. Interesting but ultimately unsatisfying.

Until I at last see your comment, which it make me glad to find island of reason in ocean of empty talk, it was also sad to read all other comments. Just like the lady who make interview with the man in the program they are not interested in what is true and reality. They just want the feeling of "love" and "meaning" that they think "faith" illusion give them. Also we see how strong is poison of religion propaganda on the dear children and Stockholm syndrom effect: The man go back to religion of childhood that hold him like a hostage in a violent life. It is like wife go back to husband who beat her.

What was the most important for David Hume? Truth and the reality! It is sign of the true greatest thinker like also Nietzsche, Marx, Bertrand Russell, Albert Einstein and Richard Feynman. Thanks these great intellects people in avanced countries like Sweden, and peoples in eastern Europe especially thanks Marx, are free from opium of religion! Today we have Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris and Stephen Hawking. They are great intellects who can be on one show you wish "about maintaining spiritual and intellectual independence from religion" not only later in life but any time in life!

I join you to wish to have this one show. Will it ever happen? Doubt is very strong but we must also have "Faith"! ;-)

I think intellectual independence (if there is such a thing) would drive a consistent, honest atheist or agnostic to despair. That may be why this isn't a show about maintaining spiritual and intellectual independence from religion in the face of social pressures and approaching death. Feeling oneself independent of what some think of as coping mechanisms is a cheap thrill in the face of meaninglessness, don't you think? I don't know what Hume had to laugh about.

Isnpiring. My perpetual inner doubter responds with outstretched arms. My inner believer responds with outstretched mind. We grapple and grasp; the struggle for our own inner peace.Wonderful!

Quest

all one
the past and future infinite
the present nothing

So much to ponder! it was a soulful show. Who is Fanny Howard? I think there was a great truth in confusing self with soul.
Christian Wiman took me to places that were once alive but forgotten. Thank you.

This show is my weekly "spiritual facial" or cleansing. After a full week of feeling brutalized by popular culture, the consistent human disappointments at work and out in the World at large, the societal duldrums and constant feelings of "is this it??" or "what is this anyway?", this show always resets my internal clock somehow making me feel grounded/connected again, if only temporarily.

I do not pretend to understand such wondrous things, but the likelihood that man created God explains things far better than how I was taught in my Baptist church as a child. This of course in no way should imply that God isn't real because he does live, he lives within my heart.

I therefore now explain my soul as my Self. Or more to the point, the story I have created for myself. That my story includes God, faith and prayer is something I would wish for everyone but preach to no one. This level of consciousness is Reality. Even if it is mine alone.

I love the way your mind weaves, in and out, picking up stitches, dropping others, bread crumbs along your path, creating something beautiful, a bowl to hold other's understanding or others forming one's own weaving. Perhaps at one point ever so long ago we shared the same parents. My mother told me her grandmother's name was Vroman here in Southern California in the late 1800s.

Great subject of choice, reaching out to topics once thought of as taboo, are now
The talk of scholars as well as the open minded laymen Thank you very much.

Translated by B.Z. Bokser from the Hebrew essay "The Pangs of Cleansing" by R. Abraham Isaac Kook (early 1900's)
The tendency of unrefined people to see the divine essence as embodied only in words and in letters(scripture) is a source of embarrassment to humanity, and atheism arises as a pained outcry to liberate man from this narrow and alien pit, to raise him from the darkness of focusing on letters and expressions, to the light of thought and feeling, finally to place his primary focus on the realm of morals... in the ruins wrought by atheism will the higher knowledge of God erect her Temple. In place of the presumptuous and vain preoccupation with divine essence the human heart will be oriented to concern itself with pure morality and the heroism for higher things...Whoever recognizes the essence of atheism from this perspective embraces the positive element in it and traces it back to its origins in holiness. ( please forgive any clumsy paraphrasing) Paulist Press 1978

God calls people to disbelief so that faith can take a new form”

James Joyce called this the “monomyth,” Christians death and resurrection, Adonis, Persephone…what am I missing here? I suppose Jung would call it an archetype.

Picasso said:
Every act of creation is preceded by an act of destruction.

This, to me, is the beginning of all wisdom. It is the starting point!

Christian’s friend Meister Eckhart also said:
Man’s greatest leave taking is to leave God to find god.

Christian speaks highly of the solace of a group, a community, a church, a practice.

Schopenhauer said:
If something is repeated time and again without contradiction, it becomes truth be it true or not.

We become what we practice. Every organized religion knows and implements this axiom.

Christian, I, too, have been close to death twice in my life, once thirty years ago in a car wreck (6 weeks in intensive care). And 4 years ago I survived the “widow maker.” In both incidents I was proclaimed officially dead. That given, I don’t think Wallace Stephens is full of crap. Quite frankly death for me was just “the next thing.” I came out of the experiences loving life more and fearing death less.

John Donne said it well:
Any man’s death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind;
and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls;
it tolls for thee.

And so, after seeing life through the “lens of death,” twice, it has changed the way I see the world. And since we share a love of poetry, I will leave you with some verse that has guided me:

The Layers
Stanley Kunitz

I have walked through many lives,
some of them my own,
and I am not who I was,
though some principle of being
abides, from which I struggle not to stray.
When I look behind,
as I am compelled to look
before I can gather strength
to proceed on my journey,
I see the milestones dwindling
toward the horizon
and the slow fires trailing
from the abandoned camp-sites,
over which scavenger angels
wheel on heavy wings.
Oh, I have made myself a tribe
out of my true affections,
and my tribe is scattered!
How shall the heart be reconciled
to its feast of losses?
In a rising wind
the manic dust of my friends,
those who fell along the way,
bitterly stings my face.
yet I turn, I turn,
exulting somewhat,
with my will intact to go
wherever I need to go,
and every stone on the road
precious to me.
In my darkest night,
when the moon was covered
and I roamed through wreckage,
a nimbus-clouded voice
directed me:
"Live in the layers,
not on the litter."
Though I lack the art
to decipher it,
no doubt the next chapter
in my book of transformations
is already written,
I am not done with my changes.

This next one is by a poet/singer/songwriter named Bill Morrissey:

Inside

This ain’t Hollywood
it never really gets that good

Call it love if you think you should
no need to explain

Tonight it’s just you and me
a furnished room, black & white TV

the late movie runs till 3
and it’s just you & me again

with no work just a lot of talk
I quit drinking now I watch the clock

I count the minutes in the stars
till the sun crowns up again

and you won’t leave soon because I know
you’re just like me with no place to go

and there’s a love still hear & nothings died
it just got hurt and buried deep inside

Now this ain’t Hollywood
it ain’t Venice or Malibu

nothing like I promised you
when we set off years ago

you’re waiting tables from one till nine
I fill out forms and stand in line

no work just a waste of time
and every day’s the same

you’re home later each night I see
I fix dinner while you talk to me

and then we wait for the late movie
to take us away again

and you won’t leave soon because I know
you’re just like me with no place to go

no place to go it’s just a matter of time
to find somewhere it’s just a matter of time

Now this ain’t Hollywood
it never really gets that good

call it love if you think you should
no need to explain

~Bill Morrissey

Some will surely find this song sad. You seem to like the word reality. This verse to me is about reality and how we deal with it. It is about love…real love.

A friend shared this site w/me as I tackle almost daily struggles due to health issues. TY for the thoughtful prose presnted here.

Loved hearing Christian read his poems (and quote memorized poetry by others...a disappearing art!). I'd read some of his poems before, soon after his book came out, and I admit didn't quite connect with them then...probably because I didn't spend enough time with them and was hearing them (and him) wrong. Then again, while there's plenty of poetry that feels more like itself when read in silence and in the space of your mind/heart, some poetry just comes to life--almost like a shock--when read aloud. I found Every Riven Thing to be an almost completely different poem when I heard it. It was resounding. Thanks for putting this show together...I so appreciated Christian's authenticity, thoughtfulness, and lack of self-importance. I regret that he's no longer the editor of Poetry as I think the world of poetry, which has been so crammed into an academic ghetto (granted, it's the only place that seems to have the power to 'protect' it...maybe...) truly needs more people like him shaping it.

I listened to a podcast with poet Christian Wimam, who is currently teaching at Yale divinity School, and suffering for an incurable blood cancer. During the interview Krista and Christian discussed their spiritual / religious upbring. Christian who grew up in West Texas in a deeply religious baptist , but violent family( He's mother watched her father shoot and kill her mother and then he shot himself.) discusses he's overall view on faith in todays society.

Christian starts out talking about faith and how it has taken on new forms. His thoughts are that some people need to unbelieve, and find their own religious path. This is what happened to him. "Doubt is part of faith can't be separated to sing of God, might sing of Godlessness." Christian went off to college and become agnostic, but in his later years he turned back to God which remained latent since childhood. He's return to faith was because of finding and falling in love. "Love can open up the world in different ways." Christian resided a poem: "The more he love me, the more I love the world." With finding true love he said he found God again. "God is in us trying to return to the source/faith. Christian goes on to talk about how in todays society we deflected the questions of the souls into the questions of ourselves. We created a society / culture for others, not ourselves. (facebook, twitter) We tend to work on structuring ourselves on the top, rather than the foundation of who we are.

Now with faced with his own mortality , and the notion that knowing your time is coming to an end makes your life more beautiful, is a load of crap. He talks about how still it's hard to imagine his own death, and is still unsure of the afterlife. He believes that there is a new faith coming. We are discovering a new language of faith and the forms we are expressing this through is becoming more about openness then following rules. Christian hopes for a middle ground religion with elements of spirituality, art, and understanding.

I really connected with Christians view that we are overwhelmed by our lives that we don't have time to focus on the purpose of our lives. This for me is the greatest paradox of all!

Christian wiman the writer of my bright abyss , Christians mother at the age of 14 watched her mother get shot by her father who then turned the gun on himself, and had to raise him. he was diagnosed with cancer in his 30's and I can really relate to him in this sence, I have a rare autoimmune disease that can turn into lucimia and when he is talking about being not poetic but afraid and he also talks about praying and meditating and falling into dispare and I can really relate, I have had a long life of problems that could lead any man to doubt his faith , but I have found my faith gets stronger as I fall into medical issues and it sounds like wiman does aswell. and I am not a poet but I read the story. and his story is a truly inspiring symbolof faith even though he did doubt.

when you really think about it, this guy had it extremely rough and still managed to make a success out of his life. I mean he has lost both of hi parents and not only did he lose his parents but they were both killed by his father, wow and then from there he gets lucimia. but he still becomes a poet (writting about very depressing things) but still this guy did the best with the hand that he was dealt, and the fact that his faith was not completely deminished by this is asstounding

wow this guy has had a hard life, with a lot of disasters and trials i mean lucimia, man that sucks take it from me that really sucks, but still this guy pours out his emotion onto paper. like a true poet and his emotion does still include his doubt but still he does the best with what he was given and that is inspirational, especially to me. Really I am surprised that he didnt doubt more. I have gone through chemo therapy myself and i
i tell you it sucks, the tiredness the achey feeling the weakness, its not fun. but thats the point being a servant of god is supposed to be hard and painful sometimes thats why we need faith. good job christian you are truelly inspirational.

one thing iI was always told growing up is "no matter how bad you have it someone else still has it worse". now how on earth is that supposed to make me feel better?, seriously i mean its not a competition that i want to win exactly, and how exactly is someone elses suffering supposed to make me feel better? really? wow. but now whenever i see someone who has clearly had it rough I do respect them more and l see it more like a test of faith than a problem now. so keep it up

let me tell you something as long as everything is going our way it is easy to say its because of god but when things go bad we tend to blame god. but why? what good can come of it seriously. when things dont go our way we reject the creator.who is the only one who can do anything about it, that doesnt make scence , i can tell you from experience when you have nothing else , its amazing how much faith you can have, and i think that christian is an example of that

I concur wholeheartedly. There is a sense of bitterness that I believe is human nature for us to fall into, whenever something seemingly negative happens in our lives. However I know, that God can use these trials and tribulations for God, to teach us numerous lessons in our lives. When our faith wavers it is important to remind ourselves of the hope that is given to us by a God who loved us so much that he sent his Son to Earth so that we, who are cleansed by the blood, might live with him eternally

Having been raised in a Christian atmosphere, being a pastor's child, the ideas that these individuals struggled with resonated with me immensely. Wiman speaks of his experiences and tough things that he went through, which cause him to doubt. He described this in such a way pertaining to joy and sorrow and how he is moved to feel. I believe that this is strongly correlated with his own doubts and thoughts about God. He speaks of how he has/does feel moments of godlessness, but does not believe that that is a bad thing. As Christians, Christian and Krista discuss the idea of having those doubts making clear that that lacking of faith is part of the Christian journey.
This really spoke to me in terms of my own walk with God. I find myself time and time again struggling with the idea of my faith, doubting God wondering if he will ever intercede on my behalf. When I heard these two adults who are seemingly mature in their walks with God and understandings of theology speak of their own struggles, I was comforted. Here are these two individuals who are discussing that doubting is even part of mature faith. Faith is not something that can be entirely mastered and that was made clear by Christian and Krista. In my own journey, this is something that I found unbelievably important to become aware of.