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6Reflections

Reflections

still one of my favorite quotes ever.

This quote has come up in several other shows, but I always dig hearing it in surprising contexts.

I never get tired of those words that I read so long ago. I look forward to the new interview -- or should I say that I'm very intrigued and perhaps even desperate to read of a different kind of capitalism --

Ms. Novogratz's ideas about "patient capitalism" are nothing less than thought-provoking and challenging. Ever since our final editorial listen yesterday, I've had a running interior dialogue debating the pros, cons, and unknowns to her approach. I've come up with no profound answer or conclusion for myself... *grin*

Ms. Novogratz's ideas about "patient capitalism" are nothing less than thought-provoking and challenging. Ever since our final editorial listen yesterday, I've had a running interior dialogue debating the pros, cons, and unknowns to her approach. I've come up with no profound answer or conclusion for myself... *grin*

"Ah, whom can we ever turn to in our need?
Not angels, not humans, and already the knowing animals are aware
that we are not really at home in our interpreted world.
Perhaps there remains for us some tree on a hillside, which every day we can take into our vision;
there remains for us yesterday's street and the loyalty of a habit so much at ease
when it stayed with us that it moved in and never left.
Oh and night: there is night, when a wind full of infinite space gnaws at our faces.
Whom would it not remain for--that longed-after, mildly disillusioning presence,
which the solitary heart so painfully meets.
Is it any less difficult for lovers?
But they keep on using each other to hide their own fate.
Don't you know yet?
Fling the emptiness out of your arms into the spaces we breathe;
perhaps the birds will feel the expanded air with more passionate flying."

- from "The First Elegy" of Rainer Maria Rilke as translated by Stephen Mitchell.

Man I love Rilke :-)

apples