October 27, 2011

Krista's Journal: Compassion Is a Skill to Be Developed

November 12, 2009

The title we've given this program is slightly tongue-in-cheek. It appeared in a British newspaper after the publication of scientific study results on Matthieu Ricard's brain. He dismisses this label and has issued many good-natured disclaimers. We've revived it here, however, because of the lovely way in which Matthieu Ricard fills that phrase with a whole new range of savvy, satisfying meaning. I certainly found myself identifying with Ricard's descriptions, in his own writing, of his youthful, worldly-wise dismissal of "happiness" as a goal. I too was dismissive, well into adulthood, of the very word "happiness" and its overwhelming associations with the dream-come-true state that ends movies, for example, or the happiness as "having it all" American way. But Matthieu Ricard puts words to what I've learned as I've grown older. He accomplishes that as much with his ideas as with his presence. He is a slightly incongruous yet wholly comfortable Frenchman swathed in the lavish gold and red of Tibetan monastic robes, with practical shoes beneath. He is at once sophisticated and mischievous, intellectual and childlike — something, that is, like his teacher the Dalai Lama. It was a privilege to experience them both at a series of gatherings in Vancouver, British Columbia, where they were in conversation with Nobel laureates, scientists, social activists, and educators. We converted a tenth-floor suite at the Shangri-La Hotel, aptly named and somewhat surreal, into a production suite for this interview, which you can view as well as hear on our site. I am fascinated by the way in which science is interwoven with Matthieu Ricard's life story as well as his current work with the Dalai Lama and his very definition of the spiritual quest. He is one of those so-called "Olympic meditators" — people who have meditated tens of thousands of hours and whose brains have been studied and yielded important new insights into something called neuroplasticity — the human brain's capacity to alter across the life span. This is a fairly recent and fairly dramatic — and not uncontroversial — discovery that came about as a result of research involving the Mind and Life Institute — a fascinating dialogue with scientists from many disciplines that the Dalai Lama has been hosting for several years. Matthieu Ricard actually began his life as a molecular biologist, working with a Nobel Prize- winning biologist at the prestigious Pasteur Institute in Paris. His decision to leave France for a Buddhist monastic path greatly perplexed his father, Jean-François Revel, a philosopher who was a pillar of French intellectual life. But as he describes in a literary dialogue with his father that was published as The Monk and the Philosopher, Tibetan Buddhism was less of a departure in his mind than in his father's. He had become drawn to the spiritual masters, who would later become his teachers and eventually his peers, leading lives of integrity. And there was a very personal, full-circle integrity in his love of the natural world that had manifest itself in part in biological research — and in his appreciation for Buddhist spirituality as a life shaped by what he describes as "contemplative science." I am utterly fascinated by the echoes between science and spirituality that Matthieu Ricard has continued to pursue and that we discuss together in this program. Will neuroscience one day be able to not merely describe the movement of neurons and brain chemistry but add its own vocabulary to the meaning and nature of human consciousness, as related to or distinct from the brain? And how can we not be fascinated by the evocative echoes between the way quantum physicists have come to describe energy and matter and the way Buddhist philosophy has always described the interconnectedness and impermanence of human experience and all of life. Our understanding of the intersection of mind, life, body, and however you want to define the human spirit continues to unfold and develop, and is one of the most intriguing frontiers of this century. Next week, we'll present another interview from my time in Vancouver, with neuroscientist Adele Diamond, who is learning things about the brain that may change all of our imaginations about education and life.

Recommended Reading

Image of The Quantum and the Lotus: A Journey to the Frontiers Where Science and Buddhism Meet
Author: Matthieu Ricard, Trinh Xuan Thuan
Publisher: Broadway Books (2004)
Binding: Paperback, 320 pages

This book captures a dialogue he had about science and Buddhism with the Vietnamese-born astrophysicist Trinh Xuan Thuan in 2000. It's a remarkable conversation with provocative chapter titles like "Mirages of Reality" and "The Universe in a Grain of Sand" — the latter you can read in whole on our site.

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is a French-Tibetan monk and the Dalai Lama's French interpreter. He's also the founder of the humanitarian organization Karuna-Shechen.

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