The On Being Project

Courtney E. Martin
Courtney E. Martin

is a columnist for On Being. Her newest book, The New Better Off: Reinventing the American Dream, explores how people are redefining the American dream (think more fulfillment, community, and fun, less debt, status, and stuff). Courtney is the co-founder of the Solutions Journalism Network and a strategist for the TED Prize. She is also co-founder and partner at Valenti Martin Media and FRESH Speakers Bureau, and editor emeritus at Feministing.com.

Courtney has authored/edited five books, including Do It Anyway: The New Generation of Activists, and Perfect Girls, Starving Daughters: How the Quest for Perfection is Harming Young Women. Her work appears frequently in The New York Times and The Washington Post. Courtney has appeared on the TODAY Show, Good Morning America, MSNBC, and The O’Reilly Factor, and speaks widely at conferences and colleges. She is the recipient of the Elie Wiesel Prize in Ethics and a residency from the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Centre. She lives with her partner in life and work, John Cary, in Oakland, and their daughters Maya and Stella. Read more about her work at www.courtneyemartin.com.

The Benefits of Sending Your Privileged Child to an “Underperforming” School

by Courtney E. Martin

Economically privileged parents may think of school as a pipeline to success, but they can be so much more. How underperforming schools can offer a type of education that money could never buy.

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The Benefits of Sending Your Privileged Child to an “Underperforming” School

Three Pieces of Advice for the Creative Life

by Courtney E. Martin

Courtney Martin examines the “tragic gaps” in the creative life — between our hard realities and what we dream is possible.

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Three Pieces of Advice for the Creative Life

Goodbye, Breastfeeding

by Courtney E. Martin

Courtney Martin reflects on the end of five years of breastfeeding her daughters, and the wisdom and the weirdness of the body.

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Goodbye, Breastfeeding

Remember This the Next Time You Are Rejected

by Courtney E. Martin

Rejection is hard. When it happens, it’s important to not let it stifle your creativity, your work, your vision for what you want the world to be.

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Remember This the Next Time You Are Rejected

Challenging the Myths We Believe About Our Children’s Education

by Courtney E. Martin

As a parent of privilege, the decision to send your child to an underperforming school can be met with judgment and worries about safety and lack of resources. But what if these concerns aren’t as true as we believe them to be?

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Challenging the Myths We Believe About Our Children’s Education

Sitting Alongside Suffering

by Courtney E. Martin

Suffering is universal. It’s time I grew wiser about how to sit alongside it.

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Sitting Alongside Suffering

Stop Asking And Answering Other People’s Questions

by Courtney E. Martin

Courtney Martin considers the ethical questions parents face when trying to decide where their kids should go to school — and calls us to ask ourselves if the questions we ask match our values.

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Stop Asking And Answering Other People’s Questions

The Hard Work of Disagreeing with Those Who Are Similar to Us

by Courtney E. Martin

In our conversations about echo chambers and the necessity of speaking across difference, we often forget the importance — and difficulty — of disagreeing with the people most like us. On what’s lost when we don’t make that effort.

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The Hard Work of Disagreeing with Those Who Are Similar to Us

What Do We Know of Genuine Apology and Deep Healing?

by Courtney E. Martin

From #metoo to Black Lives Matter, what does deep healing — and sincere, honest reconciliation — look like? It’s time to make space for soul work; for reparations; for ritual.

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What Do We Know of Genuine Apology and Deep Healing?

The Body Remembers

by Courtney E. Martin

New research reveals that trauma experienced in childhood has longterm damaging effects on quality of life and lifespan. But the same research shows that adults play a critical role in helping children overcome this damage.

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The Body Remembers
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