The On Being Project

Marie Sambilay
Marie Sambilay

Marie grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area and studied at New York University — where she picked up a degree in Media, Culture, and Communications, and a passion for media in the public service, in exchange for her ability to walk slowly. A voracious consumer of podcasts, she joined the team at On Being to fulfill her dream of contributing to the kind of enlightening programming that has captivated her as a listener during so many long city strolls.

Previously, Marie explored various avenues of media production — including television and documentary production, newspaper editing, and advertising.

Her other obsessions include language, British comedy, large-breed dogs, documenting poignant and humorous moments that she encounters from day to day, and winning huge amounts of imaginary money while playing Jeopardy! over dinner.

Joy Is Not a Luxury

The work of building inclusive spaces is hard, lifelong work. But it can be nourished by a deep sense of abiding joy.

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Joy Is Not a Luxury

The Devils of Luzón

A visual tour of a whimsical and unsettling carnival of masked figures and horned demons — a survivor of northern Spain’s Celtic roots.

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The Devils of Luzón

When a White Evangelical Is Called a Racist Because of Who He Voted For

A white Evangelical Christian, and a Trump supporter, offers a gentle challenge: to put our preconceived notions aside, and understand each other more deeply than what we put on our ballots.

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When a White Evangelical Is Called a Racist Because of Who He Voted For

A Faith Lived Out in Poetry and Prayer

A gift of verse as we reach the close of the season of Ramadan — testaments to the comfort of faith across a lifetime, from the safety of home to the surprising kinship of a stranger.

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A Faith Lived Out in Poetry and Prayer

One in Four: What it Feels Like to Have A Loved One in Prison

Our corrective actions can have radiating effects, placing a burden on those who don’t deserve it. A moving revelation of the extended trauma of mass incarceration — farther reaching than we might imagine.

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One in Four: What it Feels Like to Have A Loved One in Prison

The Strengths We Have, and the Strengths We Want to Develop

What if we focused on strengthening the characteristics we have, rather than on all the ways in which we’re lacking? Digital trailblazer Tiffany Shlain explores a heartening alternative to diagnostic psychology, and our empowering capability to shape who we are into who we want to be.

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The Strengths We Have, and the Strengths We Want to Develop

Time Doesn’t Heal All Wounds: Robert Ross on Breaking the Narrative of Trauma

Trauma can be a rigid dictator of the course of a life, often giving rise to paths of destruction and illness. Dr. Robert Ross on why these cycles exist, and on our responsibility as members of the community to heal the broken spaces in the structures we live in.

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Time Doesn’t Heal All Wounds: Robert Ross on Breaking the Narrative of Trauma

Reimagining a Christmas Classic

As these days of anticipation of Christmas draw closer, a creative reimagining of “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel” by Bipolar Explorer for your listening pleasure.

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Reimagining a Christmas Classic

A Song Stopped in Time

Count Basie and Helen Humes’ nostalgic rendition of a 1920’s jazz classic provides the perfect accompaniment to a stunning piece about love, marriage, and lifelong partnership.

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A Song Stopped in Time

Imperfect Music, Profound Connection: A Bridge to Kinship and Compassion

The Philippine-Catholic ritual of pabasa reveals the power of song to reacquaint us with tradition, bridge superficial divides, and connect us through the kinship of our imperfections.

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Imperfect Music, Profound Connection: A Bridge to Kinship and Compassion
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