Author

Image of Sharon Salzberg

Sharon Salzberg

Sharon Salzberg is a meditation teacher and the cofounder of the Insight Meditation Society in Barre, Massachusetts. She is the co-author of Love Your Enemies. Her other books include Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness, Real Happiness: The Power of Meditation, and Real Happiness at Work: Meditations for Accomplishment, Achievement, and Peace.

View

  • List View
  • Standard View
  • Grid View

78 Results

It can be easy to fall into distorted channels of self-doubt and self-criticism. But, rather than trying to suppress those feelings, personal empowerment may come from acknowledging, relating, and directing them may lead to a more spacious life.
Though she's the example many turn to for guidance on mindfulness practice, Sharon Salzberg didn't always find meditation so easy. She reflects on an early retreat in India, and what it can teach us about letting go of ideals, and having faith in what is.
When we strip away various veneers, what are we left with? Sharon Salzberg on the practice of letting go of denial and the uncomfortability of avoidance.
The passage of time can seem like a dream. Sharon Salzberg looks back at enduring friendships and the journey "meditation" and "mindfulness" have taken these past 40 years in the U.S.
Actions stem from deep roots within, but how much attention do we give this inner space? A reminder that while nothing can be accomplished without action, actions in turn are made by the intentions that fuel them.
Becoming fixated on a problem at the office or an injustice to others can often lead to intense anger. But, how do we avoid the narrowness of this emotion and not let it consume us?
There's much confusion between sympathy and empathy. Our columnist tells the story of a wise elder whose suffering led her to become a model for how to have a meaningful life.
What happens when our icons are turned to rubble? Would their meaning still hold? Drawing on the Hindu tradition of ishta devata, Sharon Salzberg contemplates the Paris attacks and the Syrian refugee crisis through her favorite icon, the Statue of Liberty.
The harmful cycle of guilt can devolve into cycles of self-hatred. Guiding words on the constructive work of remorse, which can be especially powerful when directed toward forgiving ourselves.
We are genetically inclined to look for possible negative outcomes. But, does this survival mechanism serve us well in our time? Some helpful insights on not judging ourselves too harshly and creating a new sense of spaciousness within.
Too often, we confuse love with attachment. Sharon Salzberg on striking a balance between needing and a generosity of the heart — for ourselves, for all beings, for life itself.
On finding herself amidst a buzzing group of Pope Francis's admirers, Sharon Salzberg marvels at their elation at simply being in his presence — and reflects on what they can teach us about being open to receiving spiritual goodness.
When asked about love, people frequently use the word "need." Sharon Salzberg analyzes this intermingling and why we should find a way to disentangle them to better understanding of real need, and real love.