Leaving Your Faith Behind: Three Young Atheists on Why They Turned Away from Christianity

Leaving Your Faith Behind: Three Young Atheists on Why They Turned Away from Christianity

What is the path from God to no god?
John Hockenberry leads with this intriguing question as part of The Takeaway‘s week-long series “Young Nation Under God?” As you’ll hear from these three young non-believers, one’s personal identity is intertwined in these former Christians’ origin stories and family faith.
Daniel Munoz, Amber van Natten, and Emily Peterson give voice to why atheism and agnosticism are on the rise in the U.S. Now more than 25 percent of of millennials (those born between 1981 and 2000) have left organized religion. They offer insights into the challenge of actively leaving their traditions behind and why they are compelled to do so:

“The more silent people were about their nonbelief, the more shameful it was to be outed as a nonbeliever.”

How is your faith changing over time?
Like philosopher Alain de Botton, they also see some good in religious traditions. Amber van Natten looks to Buddhist principles, meditation, and yoga. Daniel Munoz says that he draws from the Catholic lessons of his past:

“People in my group know that religion offers people some very valuable things. But, there’s a lot of stuff we disagree with. In fact, personal relationship with God, even the rituals. So we’re trying to find the parts of religion we do see as valuable, like communion, brotherhood, sisterhood, and keep that but get rid of the superstition. Stuff we think is morally unacceptable.”

Want to talk about the changing role of religion in American life. Join John Hockenberry today (Friday, October 18) at 2:00 pm ET to participate in a live online chat. How has your religious identity changed? Does faith still play an important role in your life? Are you concerned that young people are leaving religious institutions? Whatever questions or comments you have, add your voice to the conversation.

Share Post

Contributor

is the cofounder of On Being¬†and currently serves as publisher & editor-in-chief. He received a Peabody Award in 2007 for his work on “The Ecstatic Faith of Rumi” and garnered two Webby Awards (in 2005, and again in 2008). The Online News Association nominated his journalistic work multiple times in the general excellence and outstanding specialty journalism categories. Trent’s reported and produced stories from Turkey to rural Alabama, from Israel and the West Bank to Cambridge, England.

Share Your Reflection

Reflections

  • Endorphin

    And me mate