Tag: history

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April 11, 2017

A visual tour of a whimsical and unsettling carnival of masked figures and horned demons — a survivor of northern Spain’s Celtic roots.

A man sits in contemplation.
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March 1, 2017

What might we make space for if we gave up our indignation, even if just for a moment? A historical and philosophical inquiry into the roots of this social moment.

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February 9, 2017

A Muslim man reflects on the pain of citizenship in this moment and the fragile hope he holds from the nation he and his loved ones call home.

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January 27, 2017

Courtney shares the practical insight of a wise elder — on the tumultuous history we’ve lived through, and the work we must do to shape our future differently.

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January 26, 2017

The aspirational ideals of our nation call us to embody compassion toward the stranger, and those whom others might cast out.

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July 19, 2016

Entrepreneur and digital wise man Seth Godin explores our capacity to use connection to elevate and advance the human spirit, on the Becoming Wise podcast.

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July 12, 2016

We find ourselves in a time of deep reckoning, and we must turn to each other for companionship and wisdom. Collected guidance on claiming the whole of our identities, and finding compassion for experiences that are not our own.

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May 8, 2016

Our cultural treasures of music, art, and literature can bind us together. But in an era of interconnectedness, our art can also be woven together with our statecraft. Mohammed Fairouz cautions against cultural appropriation by charting the story of our universal cultural heritage, from the court of ancients to the modern day.

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April 9, 2016

The Shakers are known for their beautiful furniture and for their imagination around simplicity. A critical look at the history of the Shakers in America to understand our relationship to austerity and abundance.

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April 2, 2016

Our Public Theology Reimagined columnist calls on people of faith and conscience to come into proximity with execution sites like Ell Persons. When we experience these liminal spaces, we are reminded of our capacity to become preoccupied with domination and overlook the lives of the powerless and the message of Jesus’ crucifixion.

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March 21, 2016

In an era of abundance and access, it’s easy to lose sight of the vitality of household things. An author looks back in order to look forward at the humility of thrift and the humanity of objects.

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March 9, 2016

The greatest threat to American democracy doesn’t come from outside but from within. Parker Palmer serves up three traits to look for in a fascist leader — and words and a poem from Abraham Lincoln and W.H. Auden.

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February 27, 2016

The lingering pain of a traumatic history can create a sense of helplessness. But, reflecting on her family’s suffering during the Holocaust, Sharon Salzberg realizes our redemptive agency in forming the path we take forward.

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February 9, 2016

Our paths intersect with countless others as we navigate our days, but how often do we live out the potential of these exchanges? Gleanings from the complementary persistence of Super Mario and Sisyphus, the enduring kinship of the Abrahamic family, and the unexpected inspiration to honor a late loved one from a song by Sting.

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February 6, 2016

A song of hard-working shipyards inspires the daughter of an African-American railroad man to honor her father, a man whose quiet strength fueled both his work and his love for family. A testimony to labor and providing for future generations.

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January 31, 2016

When we encounter the stranger, a deepening exchange takes place. Through the metaphor of marriage and her own personal vows, an Episcopal priest calls for a return to unity and the remembrance of the shared history and values that bind Christians and Muslims together.

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October 31, 2015

Civilizations elevate the best in cultures and people. A composer encourages us to rethink the phrase “clash of civilizations” and, by definition, civilization can only fuel human flourishing.

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July 28, 2015

How do we come to truly “know” ourselves? Through a host of childhood memories, and using a George Oppen poem as her guide, a health practitioner suggests a starting place: “Become intimate with discomfort. Pull it closer. Mend nothing first.”

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July 18, 2015

A Southern woman’s searching lament on the hot, boiling silence of Southern grief after the shootings in Charleston — and the inheritance of sorrow.

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July 10, 2015

In times of trauma, modern-day technology connects us instantly. But could it be that genetic memory metabolizes much more slowly? Courtney Martin juxtaposes modern day urgency with a long view of legacy.

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April 24, 2015

This year commemorates the 100th anniversary of the Armenian genocide. An Armenian-American woman contemplates the periphery of pain, the legacy of silence and suffering — inviting the Armenian diaspora and “the world to listen with us.”

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October 17, 2014

With the ever-widening wealth gap between the rich and the poor, statistics abound. But they fail to animate the human spirit. Story is a way into history and “teaching our hearts how to live as choiceful human beings.”

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October 23, 2012

A cache of old documents recently discovered in Afghanistan reveals a thriving intellectual culture among Persian-speaking Jews — and a treasure trove for historians and Persian linguists alike.

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June 6, 2012

Will black Mormons vote for Romney or Obama? Guest contributor W. Paul Reeve offers a historical perspective of African Americans in the LDS Church — and the decisions they must make in a pivotal election year.

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June 4, 2012

Krista and the team leave for Istanbul this weekend, and we’re looking for your advice. Who are Turkish voices you’d recommend we interview while there that can speak to Turkey’s secular + emerging religious identity?

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May 10, 2012

But there is a different story in the DNA of Oklahoma politics. It’s a truly forgotten story in the relatively brief history of this state that people fled the past to create. When the former Indian Territory became Oklahoma in 1907, it had one of the most progressive constitutions in the union, influenced largely by a farmer-labor coalition.

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May 4, 2012

Turkish secularism, in contrast to the American experience of secularism that separated religion and the state, excluded religion from the public sphere and aimed to keep it under state control.

"One Bison, Horizon Cloud"
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April 20, 2012

For the Lakota people, Cedric Good House of Standing Rock Reservation says, songs kept different memories and meanings alive. Sitting Bull sang the song above, Mr. Good House says, to remind his people of their way of living at a time when things looked most bleak — in what the history books describe as the “surrender” at Fort Buford.

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April 9, 2012

“Do your duty in all things. You cannot do more, you should never wish to do less.”
—Robert E. Lee, in a letter to his son

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March 23, 2012

In the March 8 Washington Post article “Feminism’s Final Frontier? Religion,” Lisa Miller predicted that American women would soon abandon the…

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February 18, 2011

Mavis Staples + Jeff Tweedy – "You Are Not Alone" Acoustic Who doesn’t love the remarkable and enduring Mavis Staples?…

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December 31, 2010

When I first lived in the upper Great Plains, I did so as a freshman at Concordia College in Moorhead,…

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September 23, 2010

When I first lived in the upper Great Plains, I did so as a freshman at Concordia College in Moorhead,…

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January 31, 2010

Last Wednesday was, of course, President Barack Obama’s first State of the Union address. And while coverage of the speech…

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October 2, 2009

Colleen Scheck, Producer I’m intrigued by the wildfire surrounding Dan Brown’s new novel. Frugal people I know who detest buying hardcover books…

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January 6, 2009

As we’ve mentioned here before, one of the hardest parts of the production process can be deciding what to leave…