Tag: Racism

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February 4, 2017

A deep inquiry into Trump’s immigration ban, and its subversion of the American ideals we’re called to embody.

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January 27, 2017

The struggle for soul in education and patriotism, the joy of marching in step, and reckoning with the legacy of our nation’s heroes and history.

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January 27, 2017

Courtney shares the practical insight of a wise elder — on the tumultuous history we’ve lived through, and the work we must do to shape our future differently.

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December 13, 2016

A look at icons in our popular culture reveals the crucial work of healing at the heart of the Muslim faith.

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December 2, 2016

In our pursuit of justice, we must cling to what illuminates the darkness and keep the pain and indignation that fuel us from hardening to hatred.

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November 7, 2016

Some years ago, I came across one of the most intriguing book titles that I have ever seen. It was…

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August 23, 2016

Profound moments of wisdom and change are often found in the interstitial spaces: in an exchange overlooked, in stories not shared. A collection of unexpected moments of beauty, curated by our executive editor.

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August 18, 2016

An Italian writer pays tribute to the story of the little-known Australian sprinter who was on the podium that day in 1968 in Mexico City for the Olympic medals ceremony. A closer look at an iconic public stand for human rights reveals a heartening, surprising story of alliance and brotherhood.

John Lewis holds up a photo of a table of men.
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August 16, 2016

For legendary civil rights leader John Lewis, the most powerful path to the beloved community is to live as if it were already our reality. Listen to his conversation with Krista from our podcast Becoming Wise.

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August 9, 2016

Essential celebrations of the strength and beauty that surround us, from new life and community to the poetry of words and images.

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August 2, 2016

A dispatch from across the pond on frank and generous response to difficult questions, and hovering in a magical, suspended moment.

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August 2, 2016

The late historian Vincent Harding explores the potent and challenging spirituality shared by two fathers of the movement for civil rights.

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July 29, 2016

We find ourselves at a pivotal moment in our history. What kind of path will we choose to forge ahead? john powell calls us to reform old narratives of oppression, violence, and exclusion into something hopeful and new.

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July 26, 2016

The tension we’re living through requires our sincerest attention, but we must also nurture our relationships with joy. Trent Gilliss offers hopeful words on fostering communities of humility and understanding, with love and laughter at their center.

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July 26, 2016

It is a privilege to feel that this is a time of unusual turmoil. Sarah Smarsh points at our responsibility in this revelatory moment: not just to look at the injustice we live amidst, but to act on what we see.

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July 23, 2016

We can begin to understand each other by asking the right questions — and listening to the stories we receive in turn. Lori Lakin Hutchinson sheds frank and essential light on the reality of racism in America.

Activists walk through the crowd near the Quicken Loans Arena during the 2016 Republican National Convention July 20, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.
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July 21, 2016

Drawing on the walking undead from Game of Thrones, Omid Safi comments on the stubborn disease of white supremacy, and on resisting its spread with the resilience of kinship and kindness.

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July 20, 2016

Can we be more generous in understanding those who are different from us? Parker Palmer recounts lessons learned over a lifetime on our true proximity and kinship with “the other.”

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July 19, 2016

Our days have been marked by pain and gaps in understanding. The enduring presence of kindness, mercy, poise, and the beauty of music provide guidance in harrowing times.

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July 15, 2016

The tension we feel at this moment in our history can be an opening for catharsis. Courtney Martin engages with perspectives in the dialogue that provide opportunities for greater understanding.

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July 14, 2016

In the wake of the violence in Falcon Heights, Baton Rouge, and Dallas, Omid Safi puts forth an impassioned call for the revolutionary work of love.

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July 13, 2016

When the weight of the world is heavy, music can be a balm. A musical offering for this uncertain moment, for mercy and the courage to walk together toward the beloved community.

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July 12, 2016

We find ourselves in a time of deep reckoning, and we must turn to each other for companionship and wisdom. Collected guidance on claiming the whole of our identities, and finding compassion for experiences that are not our own.

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July 12, 2016

After arriving in the U.S. in the 1930s, Albert Einstein witnessed the inequities and injustices done to black Americans. Read his little-known essay from 1946 about the “deeply entrenched evil” as he saw it then, and that pervades this country today.

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July 9, 2016

In light of the recent shootings, Krista offers a playlist for shedding light and wisdom on belonging to one another.

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July 7, 2016

Reckoning with the deaths of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling by the police, Courtney Martin pens an impassioned missive to her white children: to understand their privilege, redistribute power, ask questions, and always to hold each other accountable.

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February 16, 2016

Some of our greatest cultural treasures are seemingly beyond reproach when it comes to honest criticism. Watching The King and I, a composer acknowledges the inherent racism and reflects on how we can appreciate its art and still question in ethical and moral shortcomings alongside its greatness.

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February 10, 2016

Ash Wednesday is often understood as an opportunity to engage in the practice of personal improvement. But, what if it were used to look outward and create a more just, merciful society rather than ending with our hearts?

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November 11, 2015

What if we acknowledged racism as a disease, and treated it accordingly? A cancer survivor asks and ponders the lessons she’s learned from battling the illness as she watches recent events at the University of Missouri unfold.

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August 6, 2015

The prophetic voice is one that challenges, adapts, and evolves alongside history. Omid Safi reminds us of the sermon Dr. King never gave and invites us to live up to his hopeful invitation to create an America that is yet to be.

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July 18, 2015

A Southern woman’s searching lament on the hot, boiling silence of Southern grief after the shootings in Charleston — and the inheritance of sorrow.

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July 16, 2015

The recent success of Serena Williams and the U.S. women’s soccer team in the World Cup is a beacon of light. It’s also a reminder that we have a long way to go in recognizing the roles of half our population in sport and religion.

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June 30, 2015

Our readers and our columnists explore Vincent Harding’s question in light of the Charleston tragedy — and how we can reclaim our fears and our hopes in this great experiment. Plus, some things I’ve been reading this week (for your eyes only).

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June 26, 2015

A passionate, grounded plea to recognize white privilege and the gut level pushback — the “white fragility” — that happens when talking about race.

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June 25, 2015

We are in need of a new vision and visionaries who remind us not of the “greatness” of America, but of its goodness writes Omid Safi. A call for forgiveness, but one that’s rooted in love and justice — and for an America that is yet to be.

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June 20, 2015

The collective experiences of Black Americans can result in generational trauma that is “stored in the body.” With the stories of McKinney, Texas and Charleston, South Carolina as a backdrop, a man calls for us to retrain our brains and break free from our limiting perceptions of one another to heal these divides.

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March 12, 2015

Fifty years since the historic march on Selma, Omid Safi calls for an inclusive justice for all people — and welcomes Muslim voices to be full democratic participants — so we can cross that bridge together.

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December 11, 2014

It’s not merely a sin-sick soul that is in need of profound redemption, writes our columnist, it is also our society and structural institutions that call out for being redeemed and transformed. A clear call to question, connect, and transform ourselves and our institutions.

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December 9, 2014

A letter from Einstein on the “Negro question” is rediscovered and essays on white privilege and the theology of Ferguson are complemented with ideas about opening up to hope and ourselves.

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December 5, 2014

With the overwhelming angst of privilege, our columnist confesses to her own inclinations to participate in Twitter testimonies of white privilege. But, it’s no substitute for the moral imagination required to acknowledge the emotional lives of others.

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November 26, 2014

A powerful commentary from the mother of a black teenage son who says we need to stop talking around the edges of race and address the systemic problem itself: that we see black men as less than human.

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November 20, 2014

Three male Muslim leaders walk into an Amsterdam hotel to drop off their luggage, and they are presented with an unexpected question. How does one confront the the prejudice present in society today? Can it be confronted, or does it require face-to-face encounters?

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August 15, 2014

Rather than merely expressing outrage at what happened in Ferguson, white Americans must show courage and own its part of the tragic story and the opportunity for transformation.

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January 18, 2014

As MLK Day approaches, a bit of creative inspiration infuses his iconic “I Have a Dream…” speech. Watch this video remix and be inspired.

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December 12, 2013

Watch a recording of our live video stream with Rev. Lucas Johnson and Dr. Gwendolyn Zoharah Simmons at NPR headquarters in Washington, DC. The topic: nonviolence and how social change happens. A riveting hour story and substance.

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October 18, 2012

During the first two presidential debates, Mitt Romney’s Mormon faith has come up very little. But, as Joanna Brooks says, many Mormons continue to “white-knuckle” through this campaign season.

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June 6, 2012

Will black Mormons vote for Romney or Obama? Guest contributor W. Paul Reeve offers a historical perspective of African Americans in the LDS Church — and the decisions they must make in a pivotal election year.

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March 3, 2011

The Rykestrasse synagogue in East Berlin survived “Kristallnacht” of 1938 and was the only functioning synagogue in former East Germany….

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February 2, 2011

“I saw them in the deep South. People who were considered backward, unable to do anything became the creators of…

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