Tag: Social Justice

Chinese model Xu Naiyu watches a movie on her phone as models sleep during a break at China Fashion Week in Beijing.
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October 2, 2017

We’re beset with horrible news from all sides, these days — from the lives lost in Las Vegas to the millions suffering in Puerto Rico and Houston. Sharon Salzberg asks: Can we break out of our cycle of agitation to meet this suffering from a place of love?

Knoxville residents participate in a service of prayers and hymns for peace in advance of a planned white supremacist rally and counter-protest around a Confederate memorial monument on August 25, 2017 in Knoxville, Tennessee.
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September 19, 2017

There’s more to hope than optimism. Parker reads Victoria Safford on what it really means to stand in the place where hard, joyful work makes our vision for change come alive.

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September 18, 2017

On the perils of placing all our hope in a utopian future — and the real possibility for change that lies in our actions, here and now.

Volunteers help load cars with donated supplies outside Center Mall in Port Arthur, Texas on September 2, 2017. As floodwaters receded in Houston after Hurricane Harvey, nearby cities such as Beaumont which had lost its water supply — and Port Arthur struggled to recover. One week after Harvey slammed into southeast Texas as a Category Four hurricane, rescuers were still out searching for people still inside flooded homes.
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September 14, 2017

Avoiding burnout from the endless news cycle is important, but so is staying meaningfully and personally present to urgent realities that deserve our attention.

Demonstrators participate in a march and rally against white supremacy August 16, 2017 in downtown Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
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September 7, 2017

White supremacy is newly palpable in unsettling, violent ways. But what if our public conversation about race can encourage a new, redeemable, and joyful whiteness to come to the fore?

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September 6, 2017

The aftermath of natural and man made tragedies such disasters such as the Grenfell Tower fire in London reveals the deeper, inner work that’s required for true public and personal healing.

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July 6, 2017

Shame and defensiveness about racism are not the path to change. Our columnist extends a challenge to white progressives, and to herself: to face the reality of deeply embedded racism directly, and to resolve to change the prejudices that remain.

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June 12, 2017

The meditative ritual of bread-making becomes a respite from the frenzy and passivity of online life. A vision for an America in which all our experiences are folded together and baked in — and a recipe for homemade bread.

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March 29, 2017

Reflections, recalibrations, and resources to help us temper our anger, and find space for a constructive, healing civic life.

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March 17, 2017

Passing the baton. Gathering with others. Taking the long view. Lessons on persisting and persevering, even when we feel exhausted by it all.

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March 16, 2017

In the resonant voice of Valarie Kaur, Omid Safi finds hope for the painful but fruitful path that we must take forward as a nation.

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March 9, 2017

Solidarity on social media can be a source of hope, but there’s more required of us to affect meaningful change.

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March 4, 2017

Monotasking as a social skill? Discovering new truths in our winter years? Essential readings on new approaches to life with each other, and with our ever-evolving selves.

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February 11, 2017

Prescient words from Parker Palmer, Omid Safi, Courtney E. Martin, Broderick Greer, and recommended listens/reads from Tim Ferriss and The Economist.

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February 10, 2017

Anger can be a powerful motivator. But we must also remember to build something bolder on the foundation of expansive love.

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February 9, 2017

A Muslim man reflects on the pain of citizenship in this moment and the fragile hope he holds from the nation he and his loved ones call home.

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February 7, 2017

A writer turns away from what’s toxic on social media and chooses self-care in this cultural moment.

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February 3, 2017

Are we unconsciously selective about the causes we mobilize for? Courtney Martin asks the uncomfortable question: when do we choose to show up, and for whom?

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January 27, 2017

The struggle for soul in education and patriotism, the joy of marching in step, and reckoning with the legacy of our nation’s heroes and history.

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January 27, 2017

Courtney shares the practical insight of a wise elder — on the tumultuous history we’ve lived through, and the work we must do to shape our future differently.

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December 14, 2016

A return to the gritty heart of the Christmas season, and a vision for a holiday celebration that does real and practical good for those around us.

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December 13, 2016

A look at icons in our popular culture reveals the crucial work of healing at the heart of the Muslim faith.

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December 2, 2016

In our pursuit of justice, we must cling to what illuminates the darkness and keep the pain and indignation that fuel us from hardening to hatred.

LYNCHBURG, VA - JANUARY 18: Supporters of Donald Trump reach for bumper stickers before the Republican presidential candidate delivers the convocation at the Vines Center on the campus of Liberty University on January 18, 2016 in Lynchburg, Virginia. A billionaire real estate mogul and reality television personality, Trump addressed students and guests at the non-profit, private Christian university that was founded in 1971 by evangelical Southern Baptist televangelist Jerry Falwell. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
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November 22, 2016

An African-American professor who has spent her life building bridges across racial divides questions whether she can continue knowing that four out of five white Evangelical Christians voted for Donald Trump.

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November 3, 2016

Accepting dark realities and difficult truths doesn’t negate love for our country. An appeal for choosing American aspiration over American pride, so that we might grow into the nation we want to be.

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October 19, 2016

What if our disenchantment is an opportunity? This moment calls us not to fall backward into cynicism, but to face difficult truths, and to work together to create a new reality.

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October 7, 2016

Courtney Martin on C. Nicole Mason’s new memoir and turning toward what’s uncomfortable to witness, and then acting on what we feel.

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September 16, 2016

To stay curious and questioning in the modern world can be a lonely endeavor, and yet there is refuge and wisdom when we gather. Courtney Martin​ on restoring our moral imaginations, together.

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August 18, 2016

An Italian writer pays tribute to the story of the little-known Australian sprinter who was on the podium that day in 1968 in Mexico City for the Olympic medals ceremony. A closer look at an iconic public stand for human rights reveals a heartening, surprising story of alliance and brotherhood.

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July 12, 2016

After arriving in the U.S. in the 1930s, Albert Einstein witnessed the inequities and injustices done to black Americans. Read his little-known essay from 1946 about the “deeply entrenched evil” as he saw it then, and that pervades this country today.

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June 7, 2016

Physical presence and inner life are more integrated than we might imagine. Meditations on how we move through stress, our relationship with the body, and making meaning in the rhythms of everyday life.

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May 28, 2016

To devote oneself to battling injustice is noble, but rigorous. Sharon Salzberg celebrates the extraordinary work of agents of social change, and illuminates the importance of balancing exposure to hardship with self-care.

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April 21, 2016

North Carolina’s “bathroom bill” has created quite a stir, a political and cultural imbroglio. Omid Safi on the need to stand up and not remain silent, no matter what action you might take.

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April 2, 2016

Our Public Theology Reimagined columnist calls on people of faith and conscience to come into proximity with execution sites like Ell Persons. When we experience these liminal spaces, we are reminded of our capacity to become preoccupied with domination and overlook the lives of the powerless and the message of Jesus’ crucifixion.

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March 24, 2016

Faith can be a salve for the soul in the face of the suffering we witness. But, Omid Safi reminds us, our spiritual love must be bolstered by how we stand for the weak and vulnerable in our midst.

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February 16, 2016

An ethic of care, community, goodwill. These are things we all seek. An intimate account of #BlackLivesMatter capturing the intimacy, challenge, and familial spirit of the movement.

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November 11, 2015

What if we acknowledged racism as a disease, and treated it accordingly? A cancer survivor asks and ponders the lessons she’s learned from battling the illness as she watches recent events at the University of Missouri unfold.

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April 30, 2015

We are inextricably entwined with each other. Omid Safi sees the pain and suffering of two tragedies — in Nepal and in Baltimore — and appeals to all of us to embody the ethics of a natural tragedy, reaching out in compassion, when we’re faced with man-made destruction and systemic corruption.

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April 10, 2015

The term “scale” is the buzzword in social entrepreneurship circles. But, as Courtney Martin Often shows us, changing the world is about changing systems and helping others one person at a time.

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March 12, 2015

Fifty years since the historic march on Selma, Omid Safi calls for an inclusive justice for all people — and welcomes Muslim voices to be full democratic participants — so we can cross that bridge together.

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December 11, 2014

It’s not merely a sin-sick soul that is in need of profound redemption, writes our columnist, it is also our society and structural institutions that call out for being redeemed and transformed. A clear call to question, connect, and transform ourselves and our institutions.

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December 2, 2014

A black theologian talks with one of America’s leading Old Testament scholars about Ferguson and the place of protest and prophecy in our faith, the place for our rage, the need for honest talk, the role of education in protest, and the transformative potential of radicality.

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October 13, 2014

An encouragement to be “children of the moment,” a people with the spiritual discipline of being fully present in the here and now.

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October 7, 2014

The power of song on the radio connects three worlds to one woman, ushering her into the eternal present by conjuring up memories of the past.

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August 15, 2014

Rather than merely expressing outrage at what happened in Ferguson, white Americans must show courage and own its part of the tragic story and the opportunity for transformation.

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April 20, 2014

What in our lives can be unraveled? A poem and a reflection on the raising of Lazarus and the miracle after the miracle of the Easter story.

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February 22, 2014

A creative illustration elevates Dorothy Day’s words on “how to bring about a revolution of the heart” with a t-shirt design.

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January 18, 2014

As MLK Day approaches, a bit of creative inspiration infuses his iconic “I Have a Dream…” speech. Watch this video remix and be inspired.

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April 17, 2012

In his Time magazine article, “Heaven Can’t Wait,” Jon Meacham contrasts two seemingly competing visions of heaven in contemporary Christianity. One prominent view envisions heaven as the ethereal place one goes when one dies.

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April 4, 2012

“There are sufficient members of the world house, among them Muslim Americans, who are not only putting into practice the teachings of their own faith and cultural traditions but also exemplifying the continuing relevance of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s teachings to contemporary social issues.”

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