We Need to Stop Asking Muslims to Atone for the Crimes of Violent Extremists

Mohammed Fairouz

is a composer whose opera and symphonies have been performed at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, and The Kennedy Center. His 11 albums include Native Informant, In The Shadow of No Towers, Poems and Prayers, and, most recently, Follow, Poet.

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June 16th, 2017

In the wake of the attacks in Manchester, an artist’s impassioned appeal to the West to cast off the scourge of collective responsibility for terrorism — and embrace the world’s 1.8 billion Muslims as partners not adversaries in the battle against extreme violence.

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September 12th, 2016

As the United Nations prepares for its 71st session, Mohammed Fairouz honors the courage of those who came before us to make bold vows and asks us to step beyond our cynicism to achieve our greatest aspirations.

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July 18th, 2016

Our public discourse has been infiltrated by ego and self-interest. Mohammed Fairouz challenges convictions of correctness on all sides, and calls for a humbler, more generous political spirit.

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May 8th, 2016

Our cultural treasures of music, art, and literature can bind us together. But in an era of interconnectedness, our art can also be woven together with our statecraft. Mohammed Fairouz cautions against cultural appropriation by charting the story of our universal cultural heritage, from the court of ancients to the modern day.

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March 31st, 2016

When loss is unexpected, grief is complicated. Zaha Hadid will be remembered for her dazzling feats of architecture, Mohammed Fairouz contemplates the profound loss of the work that is now unknowable.

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March 29th, 2016

For those of us who adore our daily forms of labor, work doesn’t stop when the office closes. Mohammed Fairouz makes the case for obsession, and work as prayer and mystery and play.

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March 12th, 2016

With political rhetoric stirring people to anger, Mohammed Fairouz calls for us to cease and desist with our blunt use of destructive language and use our highest forms of linguistic expression.

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February 16th, 2016

Some of our greatest cultural treasures are seemingly beyond reproach when it comes to honest criticism. Watching The King and I, a composer acknowledges the inherent racism and reflects on how we can appreciate its art and still question in ethical and moral shortcomings alongside its greatness.

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December 27th, 2015

The political rhetoric of making America great again points at the decline of not only U.S. power, but the erosion of trust among its allies and its own citizens. Mohammed Fairouz stands up for his community in this particular moment in time.

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December 5th, 2015

Born into a world of chaos and uncertainty, a millennial composer calls on his fellow generation to embrace the richness of this age and go berserk with gratitude.

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October 31st, 2015

Civilizations elevate the best in cultures and people. A composer encourages us to rethink the phrase “clash of civilizations” and, by definition, civilization can only fuel human flourishing.

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September 21st, 2015

Two sacred celebrations coincide this year. Through the ancient story of Joseph, Mohammed Fairouz reimagines a world bound together in a common family and a common future.

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July 25th, 2015

For the world-weary, cynicism may feel safe. But, in our efforts toward self-protection, what might we be missing? A Millennial reflects on the doubt and distrust he sees in his generation, and suggests a courageous counterpoint: sincere and hopeful optimism.