A Generation-Defining Speech by a Conservative Religious Leader That Is Good News for All

Krista Tippett

is a Peabody Award-winning broadcaster and New York Times bestselling author. In 2014, President Obama awarded her the National Humanities medal for “thoughtfully delving into the mysteries of human existence.” In 2013, she created an independent, non-profit enterprise designed to deepen the engagement of diverse audiences and amplify the unusual social impact of this content.

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October 28th, 2016

In a bold declaration, one of the key leaders of the Southern Baptist Convention is taking a stand, and reclaiming the core of his conservative roots.

John Lewis holds up a photo of a table of men.
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August 16th, 2016

For legendary civil rights leader John Lewis, the most powerful path to the beloved community is to live as if it were already our reality. Listen to his conversation with Krista from our podcast Becoming Wise.

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August 8th, 2016

Two celebrated astronomers from the Vatican Observatory on the joy of discovery and delighting in what we don’t know. Listen to this podcast from Becoming Wise.

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August 1st, 2016

On the Becoming Wise podcast, feminist playwright Eve Ensler speaks of the affirming physicality of our bodies, and of finding true contentment in the lives we already lead.

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July 25th, 2016

From Becoming Wise, New Monastic Shane Claiborne speaks of bridging the gap between the structures we are raised in and the human needs around us.

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July 19th, 2016

Entrepreneur and digital wise man Seth Godin explores our capacity to use connection to elevate and advance the human spirit, on the Becoming Wise podcast.

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July 11th, 2016

Scholar and activist Frances Kissling speaks of good will and understanding, rather than agreement or victory, as bridges between difference.

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July 9th, 2016

In light of the recent shootings, Krista offers a playlist for shedding light and wisdom on belonging to one another.

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July 8th, 2016

Elie Wiesel, the beloved writer known for his profound memoir of the Holocaust, Night, speaks of the power of prayer and forgiveness in the wake of profound suffering.

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July 4th, 2016

In our latest Becoming Wise podcast, wanderer and writer Pico Iyer tells of a lifetime of discovering outer stillness as an essential catalyst to a rich inner life.

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June 27th, 2016

From our Becoming Wise podcast, mindfulness researcher Jon Kabat-Zinn on the physiological and spiritual potential of being present to every moment of daily life.

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June 20th, 2016

Unitarian-Universalist law enforcement chaplain Kate Braestrup tells the story of a police woman who embodies the both/and of love and new life, and crime and death.

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June 10th, 2016

Rabbi and philosopher Jonathan Sacks speaks of difference as expansive and unifying, rather than a force for division.

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June 6th, 2016

“Call it the hidden hand of God; I would simply call it the hidden hand of the equations. And that gets us from the beginning to here.” Theoretical physicist Brian Greene on the hidden nature of reality, and the power of scientific theory to reveal the beauty that we cannot observe.

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May 25th, 2016

“Sometimes the pain of the world seems incomprehensible. And if there’s anything that balances it, it’s wonder at the world, the amazingness of people.” Mindfulness meditation teacher Sylvia Boorstein gives counsel on finding joy and spiritual practice embedded in the rhythms of everyday life.

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May 23rd, 2016

“Are we human beings who are in community, do we call to each other? Do we heed each other? Do we want to know each other?” Poet Elizabeth Alexander speaks of our need for language to understand our neighbors.

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May 16th, 2016

Matthew Sanford, an innovator of adaptive yoga, on taking a new orientation to our physical change and pain, and the outward healing that can result.

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May 9th, 2016

Maria Popova, creator and editor of Brain Pickings, speaks of the pratfalls and promise of knowledge-sharing in the digital age.

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May 2nd, 2016

Beloved Irish poet John O’Donohue on beauty’s true grit, and finding it in the transformational edges of our daily lives.

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April 25th, 2016

Researcher and scholar Brené Brown speaks of the value and power of adversity to give rise to the astonishing strength of which we are all capable.

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April 6th, 2016

The writer’s life can be an excruciating one, especially for our host. She reveals the vulnerability of exposing herself and staying true to her subject — and even tweeting it out.

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May 13th, 2015

Krista Tippett pays homage to Patrick Henry, a mentor who speaks to her enduring intuition that, in losing rote affiliation, religiosity and Christianity may have a chance to recover their deepest, wildest heart for the sake of the world.

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February 17th, 2015

With so much media coverage of the violence and mayhem and murders, how do we shine a light on the people living lives of quiet nobility who are doing good in the world before they are extinguished?

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December 20th, 2014

Our host Krista Tippett on not playing the Christmas game of obligatory gift-giving and the redemptive human need for one another.

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November 29th, 2012

An Israeli and a Palestinian tell a story that is fiercely human, admitting grief while also yielding to joy, and it is all the more hopeful for its origins in the hard ground of reality.

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August 30th, 2012

Mike Rose on the American classroom as a space for students to innovate and contribute to civic intelligence.

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August 9th, 2012

Language and music, in that order, were the early mediums of Rosanne Cash’s spiritual sensibility.

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August 3rd, 2012

Conversations with Muslim journalist, Mustafa Akyol, and Eastern Orthodox Bishop, Elpidophorous Lambriniadis on the history and present state of Turkey.

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July 12th, 2012

The lessons from the Green Patriarch’s environmental summit in Turkey may not rest in facts and data, but in our religious traditions’ knowledge that inspiring people to do what’s best for the good of the whole.

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June 28th, 2012

Jacob Needleman looks back at the American founders. He takes apart the ingredients that grew up our democracy. And he finds that every iconic institution, every political value, had “inward work” of conscience behind it.

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June 28th, 2012

Does media coverage of Mitt Romney point out a disconnect between the spaces in which we live and the way we’ve publicly lived religion?

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June 14th, 2012

Richard Davidson on the surprising connections between brain plasticity and meditation.

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June 5th, 2012

Janna Levin on the mathematics of ultimate reality, belief, and free will.

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May 28th, 2012

Michael McCullough’s research is revealing that forgiveness is hard-wired in us — purposeful and normal. He says that to think of forgiveness as a trait of the weak and the vulnerable reflects a simplistic imagination about evolutionary biology.

Sarah Kay and Phil Kaye perform at Da Poetry Lounge in Los Angeles in 2011.
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May 19th, 2012

I experienced Sarah Kay at a gathering on Nantucket Island last fall. Collected there were the CEO of Google, the founder of the X PRIZE, and an eminent Broadway director. But each time this lovely 23-year-old took the stage to perform a poem, the audience quieted, reflected, and delighted in a completely different way.

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May 12th, 2012

Silence, as Gordon Hempton experiences and seeks to preserve it, is not a vacuum defined by emptiness. It’s not an absence of sound, but an absence of noise. True quiet has presence, he says, and is a “think tank of the soul.” It is quiet that is quieting.

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May 10th, 2012

Gordon Hempton helps us understand ourselves better as listening, contemplative creatures — not for what’s new, but what’s essential, and why.

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May 10th, 2012

But there is a different story in the DNA of Oklahoma politics. It’s a truly forgotten story in the relatively brief history of this state that people fled the past to create. When the former Indian Territory became Oklahoma in 1907, it had one of the most progressive constitutions in the union, influenced largely by a farmer-labor coalition.

Matthew Sanford gives instruction during a yoga session.
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May 6th, 2012

U.S. culture glorifies “perfect” bodies. At the other end of that spectrum, we champion people who fight when their bodies fail. Matthew Sanford has charted another way. In his lyrical memoir, he describes how he learned to live in his whole body again, despite an irreversible paralysis, in part through the practice of yoga.

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May 3rd, 2012

Through his work with both able-bodied and disabled students of yoga, Matthew Sanford sees that the more alert we are in our own bodies, the more compassionate and connected we become to the world around us.

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April 29th, 2012

It’s difficult to believe these days, when so many of us have had some experience of moving toward death with a loved one in hospice, or even a stranger on the CaringBridge website, how “badly” people died in this country until very recently.

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April 19th, 2012

Sitting Bull (Tatanka Iyotake) and his enduring teachings of humility, compassion, passion, and healing which are alive in our midst.

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April 15th, 2012

Recently I spoke to a class of college students — by way of Skype — in southern Minnesota. We talked about how religion is portrayed through news media. As often in my experience, this was a critical discussion about the narrow and often inflammatory way religion comes up, and usually in the context of politics.

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April 12th, 2012

From outside faith and within it, Christian Wiman has pondered this question: “How does one remember God, reach for God, realize God in the midst of one’s life if one is constantly being overwhelmed by that life?”

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April 7th, 2012

I have long been fascinated by Eastern Orthodox spirituality and theology, and I’m delighted to throw a spotlight on it…

Sylvia Boorstein expresses her point during a live event in suburban Detroit.
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April 1st, 2012

I picked up Sylvia Boorstein’s lovely book, That’s Funny, You Don’t Look Buddhist, years ago and loved it. Then, several…

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March 26th, 2012

One of Ira Byock’s most basic insights may be his most helpful: we must remember that, even in the 21st century, death is never really a medical event but a human and personal event. Dying is a defining feature, strange and mysterious as it remains, of living.

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March 25th, 2012

Few features of humanity are more fascinating than creativity; and few fields right now are more fascinating than neuroscience. Rex…

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March 17th, 2012

Full disclosure: until I moved to Minnesota, I didn’t get the Midwestern accent/humor thing thing that the movie Fargo so…

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March 15th, 2012

The losses in our lives can hold unexpected treasure. Storyteller Kevin Kling reveals where he finds resilience and wisdom.

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